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Glossary

Acupuncture: A therapy in which thin needles are used to puncture the body at specific sites along energy pathways called meridians. Although still widely considered an alternative therapy, acupuncture is gaining acceptance in Western medicine, primarily for use in pain relief.

Autoimmune disease: A disease in which the immune system, naturally designed to protect the body from foreign invaders such as viruses and bacteria, instead turns against and causes damage to the body’s healthy tissues.

Cartilage: A smooth, rubbery tissue that covers the ends of the bones at the joints, acting as a shock absorber and allowing the joint to move smoothly.

Erosion: A wearing away of the cartilage and bone in the joint caused by inflammation of the joint lining.

Fatigue: A general worn-down feeling of having no energy. Fatigue can be caused by excessive physical, mental, or emotional exertion, by lack of sleep or by inflammation or disease.

Immune system: The body’s complex biochemical system for defending itself against bacteria, viruses, or other foreign invaders. Among the many components of the system are a variety of cells (such as T cells), organs (such as lymph glands), and chemicals (such as histamine and prostaglandins).

Inflammation: A response to injury or infection that involves a sequence of biochemical reactions. Inflammation can be generalized, causing fatigue, fever,and pain or tenderness all over the body. It can also be localized, for example, in joints, where it causes redness, warmth, swelling, and pain.

Joint: The juncture of two or more bones in the body. The human body contains more than 150 joints. Some of them, such as those where the bones of the skull meet, are rigid. Others, such as the knee or wrist, allow the body to move in many different positions.

Ligaments: Tough bands of connective tissue that attach bones to bones and help keep them together at a joint.

Muscle: Fibrous tissue in the body that holds us upright and gives the body movement, including movement that we consciously initiate (such as waving a hand) and movement we are scarcely aware of, such as movement of the blood through the vessels or of food through the digestive system.

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs): A class of medications that work to reduce pain, fever, and inflammation by inhibiting substances called prostaglandins.

Osteoarthritis: The most common form of arthritis. Also referred to as degenerative arthritis, it becomes more common with age and is caused by the breakdown of cartilage in one or more joints. It most commonly affects the spine, hips, knees, and hands.

Pain: A sensation or perception of hurting, ranging from discomfort to agony, that occurs in response to injury, disease, or functional disorder. Pain is the body's alarm system, signaling that something is wrong.

Physical therapist (PT): A licensed healthcare professional trained to use exercise to treat medical conditions and create rehabilitation treatment plans.

Range of motion: The distance and angles at which joints can be moved, extended, and rotated in various directions. Range-of-motion exercises put joints through the various planes of movement, which helps improve mobility and function.

Rheumatoid arthritis: An autoimmune disease that causes inflammation (with pain, stiffness, and swelling) and, if not controlled, can lead to joint deformity. Most commonly, the smaller joints of the body are affected, such as those of hands and feet, wrists, elbows, knees and ankles. Inflammation associated with rheumatoid arthritis may also affect internal organs.

Sulfonamide: Sulfonamide refers to a group of drugs with a common structural component. This class of drugs includes some antibiotics.

Synovial fluid: A slippery liquid secreted by the synovium that lubricates the joint, reducing friction between bones and making movement easier.

X-ray: A procedure in which an X-ray (high-energy radiation with waves shorter than those of visible light) beam is passed through the body to produce a two-dimensional picture of the bones. X-ray images can reveal bone deformities and narrowing of joint space, which are indicative of arthritis damage and may be used to diagnose arthritis or monitor its progression.

Adapted from Arthritis Foundation Glossary

Scroll for Important Safety Information and Indications.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

All prescription NSAIDs, like CELEBREX, ibuprofen, naproxen, and meloxicam have the same cardiovascular warning. They may all increase the chance of heart attack or stroke that can lead to death. This chance increases if you have heart disease or risk factors for it, such as high blood pressure or when NSAIDs are taken for long periods.

CELEBREX should not be used right before or after certain heart surgeries.

Serious skin reactions, or stomach and intestine problems such as bleeding and ulcers, can occur without warning and may cause death. Patients taking aspirin and the elderly are at increased risk for stomach bleeding and ulcers.

Tell your doctor if you have:

  • A history of ulcers or bleeding in the stomach or intestines
  • High blood pressure or heart failure
  • Kidney or liver problems

CELEBREX should not be taken in late pregnancy.

Do not take CELEBREX if you have bleeding in the stomach or intestine, or you've had an asthma attack, hives, or other allergic reactions to aspirin, any other NSAID medicine or certain drugs called sulfonamides.

Life threatening allergic reactions can occur with CELEBREX. Get help right away if you've had swelling of the face or throat or trouble breathing.

Prescription CELEBREX should be used exactly as prescribed at the lowest dose possible and for the shortest time needed.

INDICATIONS

CELEBREX is indicated for the relief of the signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis, and for the management of acute pain in adults.

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Scroll for Important Safety Information and Indications.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

All prescription NSAIDs, like CELEBREX, ibuprofen, naproxen, and meloxicam have the same cardiovascular warning. They may all increase the chance of heart attack or stroke that can lead to death. This chance increases if you have heart disease or risk factors for it, such as high blood pressure or when NSAIDs are taken for long periods.

CELEBREX should not be used right before or after certain heart surgeries.

Serious skin reactions, or stomach and intestine problems such as bleeding and ulcers, can occur without warning and may cause death. Patients taking aspirin and the elderly are at increased risk for stomach bleeding and ulcers.

Tell your doctor if you have:

  • A history of ulcers or bleeding in the stomach or intestines
  • High blood pressure or heart failure
  • Kidney or liver problems

CELEBREX should not be taken in late pregnancy.

Do not take CELEBREX if you have bleeding in the stomach or intestine, or you've had an asthma attack, hives, or other allergic reactions to aspirin, any other NSAID medicine or certain drugs called sulfonamides.

Life threatening allergic reactions can occur with CELEBREX. Get help right away if you've had swelling of the face or throat or trouble breathing.

Prescription CELEBREX should be used exactly as prescribed at the lowest dose possible and for the shortest time needed.

INDICATIONS

CELEBREX is indicated for the relief of the signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis, and for the management of acute pain in adults.