Moving Your Body*

Exercise is an important component in staying healthy when you have arthritis.

You should try to commit yourself to regular exercise that includes 3 types of activity: flexibility (stretching, range-of-motion) exercises, strengthening (resistance) exercises, and cardiovascular (aerobic) exercises.

Before you begin any exercise, you should consult your physician to see if the exercise is appropriate for you.

*Be sure to check with your doctor to see if these physical activities are right for you. Copyright © 2012 Arthritis Foundation. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this topic, visit www.arthritis.org.

 

Flexibility (Stretching, Range-of-Motion) Exercises*

These gentle stretching exercises can be done every day and are the most important of all your exercises. Flexibility exercises can help you protect your joints by reducing the risk of joint injury, get your body moving, and help you relax and release tension from your body.

These exercises can be particularly useful for easing those stiff joints in the morning. Work up to 15 minutes of flexibility exercises a day. Once you can do 15 continuous minutes, you should be able to add strengthening and aerobic exercises to your routine.

*Be sure to check with your doctor to see if these physical activities are right for you. Copyright © 2012 Arthritis Foundation. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this topic, visit www.arthritis.org.


Upper Body – Chest Stretch*

Step 1:
Stand in front of a doorway, feet shoulder-width apart and knees slightly bent.
Step 2:
With arms bent at the elbow in a 90-degree angle, place your palms on the sides or frame of the doorway.
Step 3:
Lean forward and you’ll feel your pectoral muscles stretch.
Bonus:
The muscles on the front of your shoulders get a stretch, too.

*Be sure to check with your doctor to see if this physical activity is right for you. Copyright © 2012 Arthritis Foundation. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this topic, visit www.arthritistoday.org.

Upper Body – Neck Stretch*

Step 1:
You can do this stretch while standing or sitting in a sturdy chair.
Step 2:
Keep your feet flat on the floor, shoulder-width apart.
Step 3:
Slowly turn your head to the right until you feel a slight stretch. Be careful not to tip or tilt your head forward or backward, but hold it in a comfortable position.
Step 4:
Hold the position for 10 to 30 seconds.
Step 5:
Turn your head to the left and hold the position for 10 to 30 seconds.
Step 6:
Repeat at least 3 to 5 times.

*Be sure to check with your doctor to see if this physical activity is right for you.

Adapted from the article "Exercises to Try – Flexibility" part of , the exercise and physical activity campaign from the National Institute on Aging at NIH, and NIHSeniorHealth.gov.

Lower Body – Hamstring and Ankle Stretch*

Step 1:
Sit on the edge of a chair with your right leg extended, right heel on floor.
Step 2:
Flex right foot and toes.
Step 3:
Lean forward gently from your hips and hold for 10-60 seconds to feel a stretch in the back of your thigh.
Step 4:
Repeat with left leg.

*Be sure to check with your doctor to see if this physical activity is right for you. Copyright © 2012 Arthritis Foundation. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this topic, visit www.arthritistoday.org.

Lower Body – Calf Stretch*

Step 1:
Stand up straight, holding onto a chair or some other stable object.
Step 2:
Put left leg behind you, keeping left heel on the floor.
Step 3:
Bend right knee and lean toward the chair, holding for 10-60 seconds. You should feel the stretch in the calf of the left leg.
Step 4:
Repeat with right leg.

*Be sure to check with your doctor to see if this physical activity is right for you. Copyright © 2012 Arthritis Foundation. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this topic, visit www.arthritistoday.org.

Lower Body – Groin Stretch*

Step 1:
Stand with legs slightly wider than shoulder width and hold onto a stable object like a chair.
Step 2:
With left foot facing forward, point right foot to right 45 degrees, then lunge to the right without letting knee go past toes.
Step 3:
Repeat move on left side.

*Be sure to check with your doctor to see if this physical activity is right for you. Copyright © 2012 Arthritis Foundation. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this topic, visit www.arthritistoday.org.

Lower Body – Leg Swings*

Step 1:
Stand up straight, holding onto a chair or some other stable object with your left hand for support.
Step 2:
Standing to the right side of the chair on your left leg, move your right leg to the front, side, and back, tapping your toe at each point.
Step 3:
Repeat with left leg.

*Be sure to check with your doctor to see if this physical activity is right for you. Copyright © 2012 Arthritis Foundation. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this topic, visit www.arthritistoday.org.

 

Strengthening (Resistance) Exercises*

When you have arthritis, strong muscles may help to lessen the stress on your joints. Strengthening exercises can help build your muscles so they can absorb shock and protect your joints from injury, as well as help you get around better. These exercises use weight or resistance to make your muscles work harder, thereby helping them get stronger.

There are two types of strengthening exercises: isometric and isotonic.

Isometric exercises: good for people with arthritis because they work by tightening the muscles without moving the joint. It is easy to target the muscles around the joints with isometric exercises, and that reduces stress on your joints.

Isotonic exercises: strengthen the muscles by moving the joint; for example, straightening your knee while sitting in a chair is an isotonic exercise that helps strengthen your thigh muscle. These exercises can also benefit people with arthritis because they can be made easier when you have an inflamed joint or you can make them more difficult when you are feeling better by adding weights or repetitions.

Strengthening exercises can be done every other day after warming up with some flexibility exercises.

*Be sure to check with your doctor to see if these physical activities are right for you. Copyright © 2012 Arthritis Foundation. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this topic, visit www.arthritis.org.

 

Balance Exercises*

Balance exercises, along with certain strengthening exercises, may help prevent falls by improving your ability to control and maintain your body's position, whether you are moving or still.

Balance Exercises to Try*

The 6 exercises that follow are aimed at improving your balance and your lower body strength. They include:

  • 1.  standing on one foot
  • 2.  walking heel to toe
  • 3.  balance walk
  • 4.  back leg raises
  • 5.  side leg raises
  • 6.  hip extensions

Anywhere, Anytime*

You can do balance exercises almost anytime, anywhere, and as often as you like, as long as you have something sturdy nearby to hold on to if you become unsteady. In the beginning, using a chair or the wall for support will help you work on your balance safely.

Do the strength exercises – back leg raises, side leg raises, and hip extensions – two or more days per week, but not on any two days in a row.

Modify as You Progress*

The exercises which follow can improve your balance even more if you modify them as you progress. Start by holding on to a sturdy chair for support. To challenge yourself, try holding on to the chair with only one hand; then with time, you can try holding on with only one finger, then no hands.

  • Have a sturdy chair or a person nearby to hold on to if you feel unsteady.
  • Talk with your doctor if you are unsure about doing a particular exercise.

*Be sure to check with your doctor to see if these physical activities are right for you.

Adapted from the article "Balance Exercises," part of , the exercise and physical activity campaign from the National Institute on Aging at NIH, and NIHSeniorHealth.gov.

Standing on One Foot*

Improve your balance by standing on one foot.

  • 1.

    Stand on one foot behind a sturdy chair, holding on for balance.

  • 2.

    Hold position for up to 10 seconds.

  • 3.

    Repeat 10 to 15 times.

  • 4.

    Repeat 10 to 15 times with other leg.

  • 5.

    Repeat 10 to 15 more times with each leg.

*Be sure to check with your doctor to see if this physical activity is right for you.

Walking Heel to Toe*

Improve your balance by walking heel to toe.

  • 1.

    Position the heel of one foot just in front of the toes of the other foot. Your heel and toes should touch or almost touch.

  • 2.

    Choose a spot ahead of you and focus on it to keep you steady as you walk.

  • 3.

    Take a step. Put your heel just in front of the toe of your other foot.

  • 4.

    Repeat for 20 steps.

*Be sure to check with your doctor to see if this physical activity is right for you.

Balance Walk*

Improve your balance with the balance walk.

  • 1.

    Raise arms to sides, shoulder height.

  • 2.

    Choose a spot ahead of you and focus on it to keep you steady as you walk.

  • 3.

    Walk in a straight line with one foot in front of the other.

  • 4.

    As you walk, lift your back leg. Pause for 1 second before stepping forward.

  • 5.

    Repeat for 20 steps, alternating legs.

*Be sure to check with your doctor to see if this physical activity is right for you.

Back Leg Raises*

Strengthen your buttocks and lower back with back leg raises.

  • 1.

    Stand behind a sturdy chair, holding on for balance. Breathe in slowly.

  • 2.

    Breathe out and slowly lift one leg straight back without bending your knee or pointing your toes. Try not to lean forward. The leg you are standing on should be slightly bent.

  • 3.

    Hold position for 1 second.

  • 4.

    Breathe in as you slowly lower your leg.

  • 5.

    Repeat 10 to 15 times.

  • 6.

    Repeat 10 to 15 times with other leg.

  • 7.

    Repeat 10 to 15 more times with each leg.

*Be sure to check with your doctor to see if this physical activity is right for you.

Side Leg Raises*

Strengthen your hips, thighs, and buttocks with side leg raises.

  • 1.

    Stand behind a sturdy chair with feet slightly apart, holding on for balance. Breathe in slowly.

  • 2.

    Breathe out and slowly lift one leg out to the side. Keep your back straight and your toes facing forward. The leg you are standing on should be slightly bent.

  • 3.

    Hold position for 1 second.

  • 4.

    Breathe in as you slowly lower your leg.

  • 5.

    Repeat 10 to 15 times.

  • 6.

    Repeat 10 to 15 times with other leg.

  • 7.

    Repeat 10 to 15 more times with each leg.

*Be sure to check with your doctor to see if this physical activity is right for you.

Adapted from the article "Balance Exercises," part of , the exercise and physical activity campaign from the National Institute on Aging at NIH, and NIHSeniorHealth.gov.

 

Cardiovascular (Aerobic) Exercises*

Cardiovascular (aerobic or endurance) exercise is any physical activity that uses the large muscles of the body in rhythmic, continuous motions. This includes:

  • walking
  • dancing
  • swimming
  • bicycling

The purpose of these exercises is to make your heart, lungs, blood vessels and muscles work more efficiently. They also can result in improved endurance, stronger bones, improved sleep, controlled weight and reduced stress.

Try to:

  • Include aerobic activity in your fitness program three to four times each week
  • Set a goal of working in your target heart rate for 30 minutes each session
  • Work up to this goal slowly, starting with as little as 5 minutes and increasing as you get stronger and are able

If you’ve tried exercising before, but were unsuccessful, don’t make a mistake by trying the same way this time. Do something new. Pick activities you can easily work into your day or find a buddy to exercise with. Sometimes this makes the exercise more a natural part of your day or gives you someone to encourage you when you need it. You can also join an exercise group.

*Be sure to check with your doctor to see if these physical activities are right for you. Copyright © 2012 Arthritis Foundation. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this topic, visit www.arthritis.org.

 

Water Exercise*

Regular exercise helps keep joints moving and restores and preserves flexibility and strength. It improves your coordination, endurance and your ability to perform daily tasks (such as walking or writing).

Why Water Exercise?*

  • The soothing warmth and buoyancy of warm water make it an ideal environment for relieving arthritis pain and stiffness.
  • Immersing in warm water raises your body temperature, causing your blood vessels to dilate and increasing circulation.
  • Water exercise is a gentle way to exercise joints and muscles.
  • Water supports joints to encourage free movement, and may also act as resistance to help build muscle strength.
  • Using a spa adds a component to the therapy – massage. Jet nozzles release warm water and air, massaging your body and helping you relax tight muscles.

*Be sure to check with your doctor to see if these physical activities are right for you. Copyright © 2012 Arthritis Foundation. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this topic visit www.arthritis.org.

 

Scroll for Important Safety Information and Indications.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

All prescription NSAIDs, like CELEBREX, ibuprofen, naproxen, and meloxicam have the same cardiovascular warning. They may all increase the chance of heart attack or stroke that can lead to death. This chance increases if you have heart disease or risk factors for it, such as high blood pressure or when NSAIDs are taken for long periods.

CELEBREX should not be used right before or after certain heart surgeries.

Serious skin reactions, or stomach and intestine problems such as bleeding and ulcers, can occur without warning and may cause death. Patients taking aspirin and the elderly are at increased risk for stomach bleeding and ulcers.

Tell your doctor if you have:

  • A history of ulcers or bleeding in the stomach or intestines
  • High blood pressure or heart failure
  • Kidney or liver problems

CELEBREX should not be taken in late pregnancy.

Do not take CELEBREX if you have bleeding in the stomach or intestine, or you've had an asthma attack, hives, or other allergic reactions to aspirin, any other NSAID medicine or certain drugs called sulfonamides.

Life threatening allergic reactions can occur with CELEBREX. Get help right away if you've had swelling of the face or throat or trouble breathing.

Prescription CELEBREX should be used exactly as prescribed at the lowest dose possible and for the shortest time needed.

INDICATIONS

CELEBREX is indicated for the relief of the signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis, and for the management of acute pain in adults.

For more information about CELEBREX and other NSAIDs, please see the Medication Guide.

For further information on CELEBREX, please see the full Prescribing Information.

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